Opening hours during Christmas holidays
Klara Källström ”Russian Bang: Bombing of Stockholm 1944”
Wed-Fri 2-6 pm, Sat-Sun 12-3 pm
Dec. 27-28 2-6 pm, 29-30 12-3 pm






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Klara Källström ”Russian Bang: Bombing of Stockholm 1944” 8 dec. – 30 dec. 2012






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Pressrelease

Klara Källström ”Russian Bang: Bombing of Stockholm 1944”

Opening December 8 2012, 2-6 pm. Exhibition runs until the 30th of December.

What actually happened that night between 22 and 23 of February 1944, when Russian airplanes swept over a sleeping Sweden and dropped bombs over Stockholm? The event usually referred to as the “Russian Bang”, is a mysterious incident that few know of or remember. No fatal injuries were found, however; the bombs hit buildings and several trees. No obvious reason behind the attack has been identified, although the theories are numerous.

The unsolved mystery serves as a catalyst to Klara Källström’s new photo project Russian Bang: Bombing of Stockholm 1944”, which is premiere shown at Nextart Gallery in Gothenburg. Källström seeks out trees in the affected areas – they act like eyewitnesses – in search of possible clues. Nocturnal landscapes are lit by the camera’s strong flash and the exposed branches and stems are examined with intrusive precision.

“Russian Bang” illustrates how the power of preconception forms the actual watching. As in “Wikiland”, which Klara published in cooperation with photographer Thobias Fäldt and 1:2:3 and for which Källström and Fäldt were awarded at Scanpix Big Photo Award, the project emphasizes how easily perception is influenced by an indicative guideline. In “Wikiland”, Klara and Thobias are following the famous Wikileaks-leader Julian Assange, but the intimate portraits of Assange never appear. The connection between the content and the title is not crystal clear. We are reminded of photography’s subjective and ever-changing nature and how images combined with texts have been used as manipulative tools.

“Russian Bang” is the first part of an ongoing photo-project based on Swedish myths that Källström has initiated in collaboration with Fäldt. The exhibition presents 11 tree-portraits in color. A new publication, published by B-B-B-Books, is also launched at the opening. In this piece of printed matter documentary footage is intermingled with fictional interpretations in verse, written by a so called mythographer. The publication is issued in a limited edition of fifty copies.

Klara Källström (born 1984) has after the examination at School of Photography, in Gothenburg 2009, exhibited her work in both group –and solo exhibitions.  The latter category includes exhibitions at the Swedish Institute in Paris, Swedish Museum of Photography in Stockholm and The Popular Workshop in San Francisco. Klara has also created the art at Danderyd hospital’s tube station in Stockholm. Together with Thobias Fäldt and the designers 1:2:3, she runs the publishing-company B-B-B-Books, where many of her photo projects have been published. All book titles from B-B-B-Books can be purchased in Nextart’s bookshop.

For more information or press images, please contact Sara Arvidsson at +4670-940 81 18 or sara@nextart.se

 

 






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We have signed copies of Gerry Johansson’s Deutschland.

Deutschland is a visual encyclopedia, a catalogue of the rural and urban landscapes of Germany arranged in alphabetical order. In carefully structured greyscale images, Johansson sensitively explores German history through its landscape, picking out the industrial scenes, industrial buildings, residential roads and shop fronts. His quiet photographs are carefully constructed, grid patterns recur constantly and each frame is packed with information. MACK Books






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Thomas Mailaender, FUN ACADEMY 10 nov. – 2 dec.






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Press Release

“FUN ACADEMY”- Thomas Mailaender
Nextart Gallery & Bookshop
Opening November 10, 2012, 12-4 pm
Exhibition runs until December 2

FUN ACADEMY is Thomas Mailaender’s first Scandinavian show.

The exhibition contains a variable list of works: clumsily executed pottery, a tattooed toilet, floor paintings and much more.  Internet and flea markets are important sources of information for Mailaender, which can be seen in his arrangements of images and the aesthetic randomness that these provide.  It’s not always the separate pictures or objects that are of importance here, but rather the strange clashes that occur when the photographs or objects meet.  A process that is reminiscent of how internet surfing affects the perception – a modern form of surrealism or dadaism.

In ”THE FUN ARCHIVE”,  Mailaender has stored images of various types. Here the cute and naïve subject matter is juxtaposed with the tasteless and grotesque.  From this archive, the artist also found material to the newly produced tapestry ”Image Bondage”, which has been designed with Nextart’s gallery space in mind.  With needle and thread, the images have been combined into a grand collage, reminiscent of a contemporary Frankenstein’s monster.  Moreover, Mailaender presents the slideshow ”Decisive Moment” – a loose and emancipated tribute to the old, French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson.

Thomas Mailaender (born 1979) is living and working in Paris and Marseille.  His works have been exhibited at solo-exhibitions in Paris, London and New York.  Mailaender is educated at Ecole des Arts Décoratifs de Paris (ENSAD) and has produced several books.

 

Welcome!

For more information and press images please contact
Sara Arvidsson on +46 (0)70  940 81 18 or sara@nextart.se






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Interview with Lotte Fløe Christensen

SA: Nature is a recurrent theme in your work. What sort of relationship do you have with  nature – is it unproblematic or is it a fearful and ambiguous one?

LFC: I do not see nature as a theme in my practise, but more as a tool I can use to investigate questions of meaning and fragility. Having grown up in the countryside my relationship to nature is fundamentally connected to a feeling of home. For me nature is evident; is not something that is in opposition to something urban or civilized, it is simply there. The world. When that is said nature, to me, also represents feelings of loss, longing and uncertainty and is thereby something I have an ambivalent relationship to. This might be the reason for nature having such a presence in my work.

SA: Would you describe your art as romantic?

LFC: In the sense that Romanticism in some aspects deals with an individual search for meaning in a world where meaning is not given, my work can certainly be seen as Romantic. I am very interested in the search for understanding and meaning that seems to be a deeply rooted human drive.

SA: Nature seems to be a popular subject in art right now. Have you had any thoughts about this, and if yes – what do they look like?

LFC: Artists have always dealt – and worked with nature, but it might be true that there has been an increase in nature-related work over recent years. I have previously not really considered this fact. Maybe because I find it quite natural that nature is present in contemporary art. I think that because the technologies, we surround ourselves with, have developed much faster than our brains, we are often stressed and feel detached and alienated towards the lives we live. I have read quite a lot of research dealing with nature’s healing and calming affect on people. I think that nature is somehow connected to something meaningful and is therefore a great tool to talk about meaning. This might be one of the reasons why artists increasingly deal with nature.

SA: In your work photographs get mixed up with objects. You pull branches and leaves out of the photographs and place them in new, three-dimensional formations. What happens in these encounters and why haven’t you decided to work with either photography or sculpture/installations?

LFC: I am not sure I can explain what happens in the space between the photographs and the objects/installations. But something happens. I see my work as examinations of different issues of creation of meaning. To approach these quite abstract issues I have in recent years felt the need to step outside the two-dimensionality of the photographs; to use more examination-methods to get closer to the subject. I think somehow the objects and the photographs are doing the same thing in different ways.

SA: What inspires you?

LFC: Literature inspires me. And books as objects. Conversations with people. Random research I come across. Exhibitions. Thoughts of material. The gap between two images. Maybe nature.

SA: You’re interested in the manifestations and acts that come out of the search for meaning. Are you never tempted to reach a target; to find a final answer? Is it possible? And what would happen in this case?

LFC: I do not think there is a definitive answer. So luckily the search can continue.

SA: What are you exhibiting at Nextart Gallery?

LFC: The exhibition consists of photographs and small resin sculptures on podiums. The photographs deal with the idea of support and fragility, signs and action and corresponds with the cubes of resin holding semi-cast twigs and paper.

 

 






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Lotte Fløe Christensen. Notes on Things of Great Importance,
13 oct. — 4 nov.






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A selection of our books.

Steidl, Mack, Walter König, JRP Ringier, Hatje Cantz, Prestel,
Thames & Hudson, B-B-B-BOOKS and Kehrer.






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With support by Gothenburg Culture Board.
We do not accept responsibility for any unsolicited material.